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art-of-swords:

Saber with Scabbard

  • Dated: 19th century
  • Culture: Turkish
  • Medium: steel, gold, gilt brass, diamonds, emeralds, pearls
  • Measurements: overall length 39 3/4 inches (100.97 cm)
  • Provenance: Sultan Murad V

The most important ceremony in the inauguration of many Islamic rulers was the investiture with a sword, rather than a crown. This extravagantly decorated saber traditionally is said to have been refitted in 1876 for the investiture of the Ottoman sultan Murad V (reigned May 30–August 31, 1876).

He suffered a nervous breakdown before the ceremony and subsequently was deposed and kept a prisoner until his death in 1904. The sword was probably assembled by a court jeweler, using a seventeenth-century Iranian blade, an eighteenth-century Indian jade grip, and gem-studded gold and gilt-brass mounts of contemporary workmanship.

The emerald near the top of the scabbard opens to reveal a secret compartment containing a gold coin marked with the name of Süleyman the Magnificent (1494–1566), the most powerful Ottoman ruler of the sixteenth century. The underside of the emerald is inscribed with the phrase “According to God’s will.”

Source: Copyright 2014 © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

sexyqueen:

Elle Vietnam April 2014

sexyqueen:

Elle Vietnam April 2014

artofthedarkages:

Architectural Flourishes from Khirbat al-Minya

Fragments of sculptural ornamentation from an Umayyad palace, mostly depicting floral and vegetal motifs.

Carved out of limestone.

Made in the 700s by the Umayyad caliph al-Walid I at Khirbat al-Minya in Galilee, Israel, where the fragments are currently held.

(via heaveninawildflower)

charlestonmuseum:

These fabulous French silk boots were the height of fashion in the 1870s. Bearing a label from “Gartrell / A La Providence / Rue St. Honoré / No. 359 Paris,” they are made of finely ribbed silk with delicate lace trim. Each shoe has seven embossed pewter buttons, extending up over the ankle. The French heel is covered in the same white silk. Paris was the fashion hub of the world, with designers and specialty shoe establishments lining the Rue St. Honoré. Even today, it is probably the most fashionable street in the world, with many major houses and brands there.

These shoes were worn by Gertrude Ellen Dupuy Sanford (1841-1902) and were given to the Museum by her granddaughter, Gertrude Sanford Legendre in 1980.

TEXTILE TUESDAYS: Each Tuesday we post a piece from the Charleston Museum’s textile collection.  Some items have been on exhibit, some will eventually be shown in our Historic Textiles Gallery and some may be just too fragile to display. We hope you enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on TEXTILE TUESDAY! #TextileTuesday

(via heaveninawildflower)

art-of-swords:

Saber with Scabbard

  • Dated: 19th century
  • Culture: Turkish
  • Medium: steel, gold, gilt brass, diamonds, emeralds, pearls
  • Measurements: overall length 39 3/4 inches (100.97 cm)
  • Provenance: Sultan Murad V

The most important ceremony in the inauguration of many Islamic rulers was the investiture with a sword, rather than a crown. This extravagantly decorated saber traditionally is said to have been refitted in 1876 for the investiture of the Ottoman sultan Murad V (reigned May 30–August 31, 1876).

He suffered a nervous breakdown before the ceremony and subsequently was deposed and kept a prisoner until his death in 1904. The sword was probably assembled by a court jeweler, using a seventeenth-century Iranian blade, an eighteenth-century Indian jade grip, and gem-studded gold and gilt-brass mounts of contemporary workmanship.

The emerald near the top of the scabbard opens to reveal a secret compartment containing a gold coin marked with the name of Süleyman the Magnificent (1494–1566), the most powerful Ottoman ruler of the sixteenth century. The underside of the emerald is inscribed with the phrase “According to God’s will.”

Source: Copyright 2014 © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

sexyqueen:

"Behind the Hedgerow"

sexyqueen:

"Behind the Hedgerow"

sexyqueen:

Elle Vietnam April 2014

sexyqueen:

Elle Vietnam April 2014

sexyqueen:

Vogue UK May 2014

sexyqueen:

Vogue UK May 2014

artofthedarkages:

Architectural Flourishes from Khirbat al-Minya

Fragments of sculptural ornamentation from an Umayyad palace, mostly depicting floral and vegetal motifs.

Carved out of limestone.

Made in the 700s by the Umayyad caliph al-Walid I at Khirbat al-Minya in Galilee, Israel, where the fragments are currently held.

(via heaveninawildflower)

cybergata:

Girls in Front by peter_hasselbom on Flickr.
Devon Rex Delights

cybergata:

Girls in Front by peter_hasselbom on Flickr.

Devon Rex Delights

charlestonmuseum:

These fabulous French silk boots were the height of fashion in the 1870s. Bearing a label from “Gartrell / A La Providence / Rue St. Honoré / No. 359 Paris,” they are made of finely ribbed silk with delicate lace trim. Each shoe has seven embossed pewter buttons, extending up over the ankle. The French heel is covered in the same white silk. Paris was the fashion hub of the world, with designers and specialty shoe establishments lining the Rue St. Honoré. Even today, it is probably the most fashionable street in the world, with many major houses and brands there.

These shoes were worn by Gertrude Ellen Dupuy Sanford (1841-1902) and were given to the Museum by her granddaughter, Gertrude Sanford Legendre in 1980.

TEXTILE TUESDAYS: Each Tuesday we post a piece from the Charleston Museum’s textile collection.  Some items have been on exhibit, some will eventually be shown in our Historic Textiles Gallery and some may be just too fragile to display. We hope you enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on TEXTILE TUESDAY! #TextileTuesday

(via heaveninawildflower)

(Source: yellowwallrun, via nomuramaya)

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